Author: Editors

Journal of the American Revolution (allthingsliberty.com) is the leading online source for original research on the Revolutionary and Founding Eras.

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How do you define “Founding Fathers”?

How do you define “Founding Fathers”? You can define it either broadly or narrowly. By consensus, most historians limit the narrow definition to six. Washington, Franklin, Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton and Madison. A broader definition would include many worthwhile individuals, such as Sam Adams, John Hancock, Joseph Warren, Nathanael Greene etc. –Thomas Fleming   I don’t. […]

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Top 10 Articles of November 2015

November was packed with fascinating articles, intriguing interviews and a much-requested review of the Broadway musical Hamilton. Our readers took a Revolutionary tour of Arlington Cemetery and our editors shared a few gift ideas for fellow history geeks. Later in the month, Journal of the American Revolution officially surpassed 3 million pageviews and 2.5 million unique readers. Not bad for three years of […]

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9 Questions with Rick Atkinson

Learning that one of the most acclaimed military writers of our time has turned his narrative expertise towards the American Revolution is exciting news indeed. Three-time Pulitzer prize winner Rick Atkinson is working on a trilogy about the conflict that founded the United States, and even though the first book won’t be in print for […]

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THE MUST-ATTEND AMERICAN REVOLUTION CONFERENCE OF 2016

The must-attend American Revolution conference of 2016 is being hosted by America’s History, LLC, one of the nation’s leading history tour and conference companies. The conference will take place the weekend of March 18-20, 2016, at the Colonial Williamsburg Woodlands Hotel in Williamsburg, Virginia. Friday, March 18 (7 pm) – Sunday, March 20 (Noon) Colonial Williamsburg Woodlands […]

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Top 10 Articles of October 2015

Things never slow down. October was another busy month for Journal of the American Revolution. We are hard at work compiling the next annual volume (March 2016) and working with our authors to wrap up the two inaugural volumes of our book series. We also had a flurry of book award nominations (November 15 deadline) and welcomed four […]

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Top 10 Articles of September 2015

Students across the United States are back in school and using Journal of the American Revolution as a key resource in history classes and coursework. We can tell by all the traffic stemming from .edu referrers. And with more than 650 articles to search, they’re smart to do so.  In September, we welcomed Robert Carver […]

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Contributor Close-up: Don N. Hagist

About Don N. Hagist Don N. Hagist, editor of Journal of the American Revolution, is an independent researcher specializing in the demographics and material culture of the British Army in the American Revolution. He maintains a blog about British common soldiers and has published a number of articles in academic journals. His books includeThe Revolution’s Last […]

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Top 10 Articles of August 2015

In August, Journal of the American Revolution welcomed five new writers: Ken Daigler, Rich Wood, Travis Martin, Janet Wedge and Erin Weinman. Since our launch in January 2013, we’ve published more than 635 articles by 101 expert authors. That’s easily more than 1.5 million words about the American Revolution! Another impressive stat: The site, allthingsliberty.com, has had 1.4 million unique readers […]

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Contributor Close-up: Michael Barbieri

About Michael Barbieri: A life-long Vermonter, Mike has spent forty years researching and interpreting the Revolution with a concentration on the northern theater. He has taught history at high school and college levels and has given innumerable presentations on the 18th century. In 1974, Mike helped form Whitcomb’s Rangers and subsequently based his master’s thesis […]

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Top 10 Articles of July 2015

Thanks to everyone for making July a spectacular month at Journal of the American Revolution. We welcomed 125,000 readers and four new writers: T. J. Johnson, Michael Tuosto, Jason R. Wickersty and Steven Park. We also tweaked our logo to add a little more pizazz. Looking forward, the pipeline is filled with an impressive range of articles. […]

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Contributor Close-up: Michael Cecere

About Michael Cecere Michael Cecere teaches U.S. History at Robert E. Lee High School in Fairfax County, Virginia and at Northern Virginia Community College in Woodbridge, Virginia. He was recognized by the Virginia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution as their 2005 Outstanding Teacher of the Year, is a former president of the […]

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Contributor Close-up: Thomas Verenna

About Thomas Verenna Thomas Verenna is a member of the Valley Forge Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution, an Associate Board Member of the Moore Township Historical Commission, and a History student at Columbia College, MO. He is an alumnus of Valley Forge Military Academy—about five miles away from the site of 1777-1778 encampment—which he […]

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Contributor Close-up: Thomas Fleming

About Thomas Fleming: Thomas Fleming is one of the most distinguished and productive historians and novelists of our time. He has written twenty nonfiction books that have won prizes and praise from critics and fellow historians, many with a special focus on the American Revolution. His twenty-three novels, many of them bestsellers, explore the lives […]

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Primary Sources Posted on

5 Political Characters of Americans

The March 18, 1777 Pennsylvania Packet (Philadelphia) published an essay by “S.” that classified five political characters of Americans. The article was republished in the April 23 Connecticut Journal (New Haven) and is transcribed below: THE people of America with respect to their political characters may be divided into the five following classes. – 1. […]

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Primary Sources Posted on

The Discharge

When a soldier’s term of service was complete, he was discharged. Besides having arrears of pay and other obligations resolved, he was given a document called, aptly enough, a discharge. This piece of paper was vitally important for the soldier, for it proved that he had departed the army legally and was not a deserter. […]

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To the Sound of the Fife

So you’ve been elected Captain of the militia company of your small Massachusetts town in 1774, and now you’ve got to train your men. Where do you begin? Probably by sending to a Boston bookseller (maybe Henry Knox) for a copy of a militia training manual. Several were published in England during the French & […]

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Top 10 Articles of June 2015

Journal of the American Revolution kicked off summer 2015 with a fun group interview and several short features about important primary sources. This source series will continue another couple days and then we will resume our traditional editorial publishing after Independence Day. We have an exciting pipeline of articles planned for July. Verenna, Ruppert, Smith, […]

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Primary Sources Posted on

Building and Attacking Redoubts

From Bunker Hill to Yorktown, a feature of military actions during the American Revolution was the redoubt. Of course, redoubts were a fixture in world-wide military operations long before, and long after, that war, but those fortifications built of earth, sod and timber were usually more complex than their simple materials suggest. At a glance, […]

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Ebenezer Parkman’s Diary

From mid-August to early October, 1774, huge crowds gathered in the “shiretowns” of every county in contiguous, mainland Massachusetts (except Suffolk, where Boston is located) to shut down the courts. These courts, which served executive as well as judicial functions, were the farthest outreach of Crown authority. People at the time offered estimates of the […]

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A View in America in 1778

Cartoons were a vital part of England’s print media in the 1770s, and were almost exclusively of the sort that today we call editorial cartoons. Artists drew images packed with symbolism expressing opinions concerning current events. Sometimes they included word balloons and captions in prose or verse, but many were simple images that left the […]

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Most influential second city?

Outside of the big four (Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Charleston), which city was most critical to the success of the Revolution? Why?   Newport. British land and naval forces garrisoned in the rebellious nation’s fifth largest city for four years. Although the Continental Army failed to dislodge them in 1778, Newport served no great […]

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Global distraction?

What impact did British involvement elsewhere in the world have on operations in North America? Explain.   As brilliantly told in Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy’s Men Who Lost America, in February 1781 Rodney sacked St. Eustatius, a Dutch-held Caribbean island that served as a major trading port for the shipment of arms and munitions to the […]

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Best listener?

A lot has been written about the greatest writers and orators of the Revolution, but effective communication also requires good listening. Who was the best listener during the Revolution and what demonstrates or supports your selection?   I’d give Henry Knox the prize for best listener. He seldom took the lead in discussions when he […]

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Greatest lesson learned?

During the protracted conflict, nations, colonies, committees and individuals had several opportunities to learn from their mistakes. In your opinion, what is the best example of a person or people learning from a mistake early in the Revolution, and applying the lesson learned later on?   Gen. George Washington spent over two years of the […]

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Favorite artifact?

Which Revolutionary artifact do you wish was mistakenly delivered to your doorstep rather than the curator of a museum?   Washington’s draft of The Farewell Address. As I tell the story in my new book, The Great Divide, the newspaper editor who printed said he liked it so much, he felt regret at returning it. […]

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Coming Soon!

The next several weeks will be a short break from the usual content featured at Journal of the American Revolution, so we wanted to take this opportunity to give you a preview of what’s planned. Next week (June 8-12) will be our sixth group interview. Five days of Q&A with multiple historians. Spoiler alert: The […]

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JAR Annual Volume 2015 Update

We are having a blast working with our contributors and Westholme Publishing to produce collectible hardbacks in 2015 and beyond, and we can’t wait to share the finished product, the inaugural fruits of the JAR-Westholme collaboration, with everyone. Yesterday, we received a box of our new books from our distributor, University of Chicago Press, and […]

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Contributor Close-up: Michael Schellhammer

About Michael Schellhammer: Michael Schellhammer is a former U.S. Army infantry, intelligence, and civil affairs officer. He served in the Persian Gulf War, Haiti, Bosnia, and Iraq. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Washington Times and The Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin. He is the author of The 83rd Pennsylvania Volunteers in the […]

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