Month: July 2014

News Posted on

Top 10 Articles of July 2014

July was another monumental month for Journal of the American Revolution. We exceeded 80,000 pageviews (our second best month since launch), hosted our fourth group interview and welcomed three new contributors: Joseph Manca, Jack Kelly and Mary Nesnay. Plus, we published our 1 millionth word! Word counts are a major part of our process as […]

by Editors
5
People Posted on

Silas Deane, Forgotten Patriot

Silas Deane assisted the Patriot cause as a congressman, merchant, and diplomat. In 1776, Deane undertook a mission to France as the Patriots’ official, unofficial envoy. Officially, Deane arrived in Paris to conduct business as a private merchant. Unofficially, the Second Continental Congress had tasked Deane with securing supplies for the army and presents for […]

by Elizabeth M. Covart
1
People Posted on

Would they change their names?

Read the newspapers published during the American Revolution, and you’ll find descriptions of deserters. It doesn’t matter which newspaper, or whether it was published in an American-held or British-held location; men deserted from the American, British, French and German regiments serving in America, and their officers sometimes advertised rewards for their return. Looking deeper into […]

by Don N. Hagist
2
People Posted on

Revolutionary Friendship

Two men are sitting drinking pints of ale in a Boston tavern. One is a strapping, full-faced young merchant given to loud laughter; the other has shoulders broadened by work in an iron forge, but is lame, asthmatic and a little unsure of himself in the big city. It’s 1774 and the men are meeting […]

by Jack Kelly
6
Politics During the War (1775-1783) Posted on

Honorable Lords and Pretended Barons: Sorting Out the Noblemen of the American Revolution

The Revolutionary War brought a substantial number of European noblemen to North America, a region that lacked a hereditary aristocracy. Although most of these members of the nobility held genuine titles, a handful pretended to be of noble birth to enhance their stature in America. But what exactly did a noble title signify, how were […]

by Jim Piecuch
5
Food & Lifestyle Posted on

A Meal Afloat

As early as October of 1775, the Continental Congress voted to authorize its first naval vessels[1], and as these ships were outfitted and crewed, the crews needed to be fed. Reconstructing the diet on board involves a certain amount of detective work, as accounts of the early Navy are focused less on the routine, and […]

by Lars D. H. Hedbor
2
Interviews Posted on

Favorite Piece of Propaganda?

Propaganda was important during the Revolution.  What is your favorite propaganda item? Why?   My favorite is Tom Paine’s “These are the times that try men’s souls.”  It’s infinitely better than his Common Sense, the last third of which, with its blabber about the British being easy to defeat, should be subtitled Common Nonsense. –Thomas […]

by Editors
3
Interviews Posted on

Most Important Diplomatic Action?

Most important diplomatic action of the war? Why?   The most important diplomatic action of the war was signing the treaty of alliance with  France. Without it America would have collapsed in 1778 or 79. The treaty created a whole new war. –Thomas Fleming   The most important was Benjamin Franklin’s successful scheme that brought […]

by Editors
6
Interviews Posted on

Best Husband-Wife Duo?

Aside from John and Abigail, what was the best husband-wife duo of the Revolution? Why?   The best husband wife team–better than John and Abigail in my opinion–was George and  Martha. We don’t have much in the way of detail about their relationship because Martha burned all their correspondence after Washington died. But we have […]

by Editors
2
Interviews Posted on

Greatest Consequence?

Greatest consequence of the American Revolution?   The greatest consequence of the Revolution is the way the Declaration of Independence spread around the globe. Eventually it spawned over 200 similar declarations. –Thomas Fleming   The creation of an independent American empire (George Washington’s descriptive) was the most important although I believe it was inevitable due […]

by Editors
8
Reviews Posted on

Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War

Book Review: Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War, Kenneth A. Daigler, Georgetown University Press, 2014, ISBN-10: 1626160503, ISBN-13: 978-1626160507, 9.1” x 6.1 x 1.2”, 336 pages, illustrations. The field of intelligence has often remained in the background of the American Revolution. With Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary […]

by Michael Schellhammer